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Humanities 1110

IHCC

Inver Hills Community College

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Other Site Pages:

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        (Class Summary)

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        Prompts

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   Makeup/Extra Credit

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Very Important Links:

   Experiencing the
   Humanities (textbook)

   "Literature" Section of
   WritingforCollege.
org

   Links to the
   Humanities (for
   online Hum subjects)

   IHCC Library

  Contact Richard

 

 

                                                          

Hum 1110
 

Weekly Assignment

    
Fall 2017

This web page provides a brief general schedule just below, in the first few screens. After that, each week's assignment is given, week by week.

               

This page is required reading. You must read it to be able to navigate the course, and then reread each weekly part early in the week.

The first time you read this, please carefully read the beginning sections--until you have finished reading the "Week 1: Introductions" assignments. Next, for now, you may read or skim the "Week 2"-"17" assignments. But then, at the beginning of each new week, be sure to carefully read that week's assignments.

(If you want to keep well ahead of assignments, then at the beginning of each new week, read two weeks' worth of assignments.)

Note: There may be a few changes in these assignments as the semester progresses.

         

2017 Group Field Trips and In-person Events
(Please keep Thurs. evenings open if possible,
until the museum events below have been established.)

EVENT A, Wk. 1: Meet in Computer Lab.  

Computer Lab B-143 on Thurs., Aug. 24, 6-8 pm

(in "Business" Building--see maps of campus). (This is not absolutely required--it's for those who are not used to online classes or want a stronger start--but attendance will be taken.)
OR summarize website for 600 w. (about 70-90 w./web page) and email it to me.

 - Alternative Field Trip (on your own for extra credit): Attend an authentic medieval fair for 3 hrs. (or more for extra credit)  on a Sunday in September in Eagan. See www.caponiartpark.org/programs/medievalfair . In the past, the cost has been free with a  $5 donation suggested (but not required). (Minnesota's Renaissance Fair is not an "authentic medieval fair"; however, I'll give 1/2 cr. for attending it if--and only if--you agree to seek out the most authentic parts of it you can find.)

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EVENTS B & C: Wks. Two visits to an Art Museum--"Mia," or the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. Two Thursday evenings--Oct. 12 (Wk. 8) and Nov. 2 (Wk. 11).
 -
Show up in the lobby of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts (MIA) at 6:30 pm (tours start at 6:45 pm) for 2 docent-led tours the first visit, and 1 docent-led tour plus 1 tour on your own the second visit for a total of 2 & 1/2  hrs. per night for two nights.: Entrance cost: free; but parking is either free on the street or $3+ in parking ramp). To get credit, write 200+ w. per tour (i.e., 400+ w. per each evening visit, or 800+ w. total). (You'll get credit for tour times, a short break, a short waiting time at the beginning, and for travel time--or roughly 200 min. per visit.)
OR
 - Do the above on your own in person in the Minneapolis Institute of Arts or in any other major general art museum (not a science or technical museum) in a major city near you for two visits. Each visit should take a total of 200-220 minutes of time: 120 min. of seeing the art, and 80-100 minutes for travel time, a short break, and any extra writing time. For your first visit, please see the following (and only the following), and write about them as you see them: visual and/or sculptural arts from (a) ancient pre-classical Western times, and from (b) Western classical Greek and Roman times for 120 min. And in your second visit, please see (and write about them as you visit them (c) Western medieval and renaissance art/sculpture for 60 min., and then look at (d) anything you want (from anytime and anywhere) for another 60 min. For every 60 min., write 200+ w. about it (or 400+ w. per two-hour visit), while you're looking at it.
OR
 - Do the above except online. Do two visits as outlined above. Break them into 200 min. per visit (and do 2 visits total, or 400+ min.). For each 200 min. visit, go on an online art tour--of online museums--to find and describe art from the Western time periods above. Overall, spend about 200 min. on:
     (a)
Western ancient art (about 100 min.)
     (b)
classical Greek and Roman art (about 100 min.)

And spend: another 200 min. on:
     (c)
a combination of Western medieval and renaissance art (about 100 min.)
     (d)
some time seeing any art you want (about 100 min.)

Write notes as you do all of this: the notes should be about 200+ w. per every 100 min. (That means 800 w. of notes, total, for your 400+ min. Then give me your rough draft notes (no need to retype!) by mail, at school, or by email with the amount of time at the top and how much time you devoted to each of the four "parts" named just above. (Count your writing time as part of the time you spend, as well, if you wish.)

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EVENTS D-E: two weeks roughly mid- to late-semester--Live Plays (or Videos of Live Plays)--a IHCC play, and a professional or college theater (non-IHCC) play (see below):
 - Attend two literary plays at a professional or college theater as described below for this class. Write 300 w. per play during or after each play and give them to me (only rough-draft form is needed, no matter how rough draft it may be) by mail, under my office door, or by email. Write at the top what you saw, where, and for how many minutes (include writing time in your minutes).
OR
Attend two literary plays at a professional or college theater on your own, choosing either plays recommended by me (Richard) or plays on your own for which you have received permission from me to see. They must be full-length plays. One play must cover our time period (ancient through renaissance times) and geographical area (Western, North African, and Middle Eastern regions). One of the plays may be any high-quality, full-length play at a college or professional theater, including Inver Hills College's play for the semester. You must see both plays during the current semester. (Alternate: If you can find a live musical performance from any of our time periods and geographical places, you are welcome to do that, instead.) Then write 300+ w. per play as described above. Please include something about the actors' names and/or the video productions so I can tell that you didn't just read the material.
OR
Spend 600 minutes watching videos based on literary plays. (If you're not sure whether something is okay, be sure to ask me!) Include something about the actors' names and/or the video productions so I can tell that you didn't just read the material. Then write a total of 600+ w. about them, or about 100+ w. per hour, as described above.

THIS SEMESTER'S CHOSEN PLAYS: TBA. Descriptions of both will be below. Plays typically run 2-3 hrs. with a 15-min. intermission. (Plan on not leaving at the intermission!) Details will be/are posted here below:

Inver Hills Play (Event "D")
The Hollow: A Murder Mystery at IHCC

Dates: Oct. 27-28; Nov. 3-4

Time:  7:30 pm

 Reservations--NO: But possibly show up 20-30 min. ahead of time to get the best seats.

Location: IHCC Theater in the "Fine Arts" building.

Cost: Parking free. Tickets for IHCC students: free (bring student ID!), seniors $8, and others $10.

Description of play:

A Murder Mystery by Agatha Christie, directed by George M. Roesler.  

George Roesler is a long-time Director and full-time faculty member of the Theater Program at Inver Hills College. His productions are always filled with insight, fun, and great theater.

In this murder mystery originally by the renowned author of dozens of mystery novels, Agatha Christie, an unhappy game of romantic follow-the-leader explodes into murder one weekend at The Hollow, home of Sir Henry and Lucy Angkatell, who is arguably Christie's finest comic grande dame. Dr. Cristow, the Harley Street lothario, is at the center of the trouble when, assembled in one place, we find his dull but devoted wife Gerda, his mistress and prominent sculptor Henrietta, and his former lover and Hollywood film star Veronica Craye. Also visiting are Edward and Midge, whose romantic assertions are likewise thrown into the mix. As the list of romantic associations grow, so does the list of potential suspects when Cristow is shot dead. Nearly everyone has a motive but only one of them did the deed: a smoking gun--but who pulled the trigger? 

More information: Contact George Roesler at 651-450-3588 or groesler at inverhills.edu.

Second Play (Event "E")

Romeo & Juliet by Shakespeare at the Guthrie Theater, downtown Minneapolis

Date: Fri., October 27

Time:  7:30 pm (arrive 7-7:15 pm)

Reservations--YES! Required by Sept. 27!

Cost: $21 per ticket for Area 2, or $16 per ticket for Area 3. Send the check or cash and a note to me at my IHCC office, B-136 (or slide it under my door) so that I receive it by Wed., September 27 (IHCC SSD – Student Success Day), or mail it to me by USPO a few days earlier than Sept. 27 at my home: Richard Jewell, 410 Groveland Ave., #401, Minneapolis, MN 55403. Also send a note with it stating:

(a) Number of tickets you want.

(b) Which Area you want (Area 2 or
     Area 3—Area 2 is somewhat
     better seating
).

(c) - Your name
     - email address
     - class name & number (or
       “PTK” or “faculty,” and school
       if not IHCC)
     - email address

Remember to include a check or cash for $21 per ticket for Area 2, or $16 per ticket for Area 3. 

Reservations: Required. Pay Richard in advance by Wed., Sept. 27. See above.

Location: The Guthrie Theater in downtown-north (Mill District) Minneapolis: Click here on Guthrie Theater. Parking cost: $6-9, depending on which parking building you use. (There are several nearby parking structures; do not park on the street at a 2-hr. meter unless you are willing to go out during the mid-play intermission to feed your meter again.)

Description of play: Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare is perhaps his most popular and accessible play. Known by a majority of our country’s population and by many others in the West and East, it has helped define romantic love in many cultures and generations for hundreds of years. It also has given birth to a number of adaptations such as West Side Story, Shakespeare in Love, and Valley Girl.

It is the tale of teenagers Romeo and Juliet, born of two great Houses in Italy during the Renaissance. The families of the two Houses consider each other bitter enemies. Romeo and Juliet fall in love by accident, conspire to meet in spite of their families, and then wed each other so they can flee safely as a married couple. However, mishandled messages create incorrect understandings of each other’s intentions about fleeing, and their love story ends tragically for both. Famous words from the play include such lines as “Parting is such sweet sorrow,” and “But, soft! what light through yonder window breaks? / It is the east, and Juliet is the sun.”

The Guthrie is one of the finest regional theaters in the U.S.A. This play is directed by head Artistic Director Joseph Haj. The  contemporary building is, itself, a must-see for everyone for its architectural splendor and special views overlooking the Mississippi River.

NOTE: Students must turn off and put away cell phones during the performance – the Guthrie reserves the right to remove anyone from the auditorium who is using an electronic device during the performance. Also, food and beverages are not allowed inside the auditorium; however, during intermission (and before and after), food and drinks are available at several snack bars. Please remember, if you are a first-time theater goer, to NOT leave at the intermission: the intermission is only a brief break, and is not the end of the play. Shakespeare plays tend to last 2½ hrs. with an intermission in the middle.

To get credit, send 400+ words about each play--and please include something about the actors' real names and how they did, so that I know you attended the IHCC play rather than watched the movie. (This event may be replaced by any live play at a college or professional theater elsewhere this semester, or by doing an equivalent amount of extra credit.)

 
EVENT F: Wk. 15, individual consultations:
on final homework analysis, figuring out your grade, or whatever else you'd like to discuss: various times & days (later in the semester, see the bottom of the home page for dates and times). 

 - Other Alternative Field Trips:
(a) Also, you may go to a play, displays at an art museum, or any other event in person or online if it ties in directly with our geographical areas and centuries: limit what you see to things about ancient times through about 1500 A.D., and just Europe, the Middle East, North Africa, and the Americas before about 1500 A.D. See the "Attendance" page in this website for more details. You would do these for extra credit hours in order to balance out other activity hours (or writing assignments) you have missed. Reasonable travel time can be included (up to 1 hr., total, for driving there and back).

(b) Other alternative events will be announced here:

(c) Alternative Music Events (1/2 extra credit): You may go to any live music event (other than music events at bars or restaurants--in other words, the music itself must be the main event, with an audience present that is just listening, not also eating/drinking during the event) for 1/2 extra credit. (However, if it fits into our geographical areas and time period, then you may get full credit.)  Look at an IHCC events schedule, usually for 1/2 credit, to see musical events at Inver.

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DIRECTIONS:

Link to Park Square Theater

Link to MN Science Museum

To Hamline University Theater, f'16

To Macalester University Theater

Link to Guthrie Theater Directions

To Minneapolis Institute of Arts (Mia) (9-17) 

Re MIA directions: Print and carry these directions with you so you
won't get lost! Online and/or GPS directions may help, but take a copy of this set of directions, too, as there are one-way streets, blocked streets, and rush hour 3-7 pm.

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Fall 2017 - General Schedule in Brief (updated Aug. 2017)

     

WEEK

(Mon.-Sat.)

ACTIVITY
NOTE: 1st meeting on campus Thurs., Aug. 24!  See Wk. 1.
 

Week 1:

Aug. 21-26
Mon.-Sat.
Fall 2017

Starting.  1st wk. of school, meet in computer lab: Computer Lab B-143 on Thurs., Aug. 24, 6-8 pm (in "Business" Building (see maps of campus). Attending will help you get a faster start on all the online info. If you can't attend, it's easy to make it up later. Or instead, you may summarize the website, 600+ w. total, with about 70-90 w. per webpage.

- CLICK ON THE WK. # TO LEFT EACH WEEK--OR SCROLL DOWN--TO SEE THE FULL ASSIGNMENT!

Week 2:

8/28-9/2

 

The Integrated Humanities; Early Culture  

Week 3:

9/5-9. No school Mon.

Egypt; the Study of Cultures

Mon. is a holiday.

Week 4:

9/11-16

 

Early Greece.

Week 5:

9/18-23

Golden Age of Greece

Week 6:

9/25-30

No regular day classes Wed.--SSD.

 

Greek Influences

Attend "Student Success Day" at IHCC instead of classes Wed. 8 am-7 pm. You may get full extra credit for Hum 1110--per hr. you attend SSD--if it's not for another teacher.  You may also attend ONLINE 24/7. Write 200+ w. per session or hour; and at the top of page, write your time spent attending and spent writing--both.) 

Wk. 7:

10/2-7

Greek Art  

Wk. 8:

10/9-14.

 

Rome 
First visit to Mia (Minneapolis Institute of Arts): Arr. Th., 10-12, 6:30 pm. Allow for rush hour. See "Events" above for more, or this week number.

Week 9:

10/16-18 No school Th.-Sat.

Jews, Early Christians, & Muslims
(Th.-Sat.: No IHCC classes--faculty development/MEA weekend) 

Wk. 10:

10/23-28

Medieval Ages

IHCC Play in IHCC Fine Arts Theater Fri.-Sat., Oct. 27-28 & Nov. 3-4

Tentative: Fri., Oct. 27, Romeo & Juliet by Shakespeare at the Guthrie Theater in Minneapolis

Wk. 11:

10/30-11/4

 

Medieval Arts & Music

IHCC Play in IHCC Fine Arts Theater Fri.-Sat., Oct. 27-28 & Nov. 3-4

Second visit to Mia (Minneapolis Institute of Arts): Arr. Th., 11-2, 6:30 pm. Allow for rush hour. See "Events" above for more, or this week number.

Wk. 12:

11/6-9 &11 No school Fri.

 

Renaissance, Part 1
(No school Fri.: Veteran's Day Holiday)

Wk. 13:

11/13-18

 

Renaissance, Part 2
 

Wk. 14:

11/20-22. No school Th.-Sat.

 

Renaissance, Part 3   (No school Th.-Sat.--Thanksgiving
Last week of 1-wk. extensions for late work. (No late work in Wk. 15.)  Extra credit & "fixed" papers also due. And no more late D2L messages.

Start planning Final Homework Analysis Paper (9 x's).
(Monday is last date to WP ["Withdraw Passing"] from this class.)

Wk. 15:

11/27-12/2

 

Individual Conferences in Richard's Office  --See bottom of home page for available times and methods of having a consultation. 2 X's.

Wk. 16:

12/4-8

 

Work on Final Homework Analysis Paper  -- Note: "Pre-deadline" for this Analysis Paper is this week, if you want a chance to revise it.
Sun.-Fri. (Last day of IHCC regular classes is Friday.  Finals start Sat.)

Wk. 17:

12/11-14

Finals Sat.-Th.

Start break Fri.

 

Final Homework Analysis Paper due I must have it in printed paper in my school office by 2:30 pm Thurs., Dec. 15; or in an email or email attachment by midnight Fri., Dec. 16, or delivered to my condo by midnight Sat., Dec. 17. To bring it to my condo, see www.richardjewell.org and then email me after dropping it off if you don't hand it to me directly.

All tutoring extra credit also is due by this same deadline.

Grades will be turned in by Tues. noon of the next week.

  

          
Weeks #1-17
(Week by Week Schedule, Fall 2015)
                               

                      

 Week 1: Introductions  (See "General Schedule," above, for dates.)

              

ASSIGNMENTS DUE THURS. OF WEEK 1 (or, for night or fully-online classes, immediately after the first class):  
                

Method of Delivery of Assignments for Fully-Online-Only (FOL) Section: 

All assignments (except as otherwise noted) may be delivered by the following methods:

  • delivery by email: please write your email's "Subject" line title as follows:  

    • start with Hum 1110

    • add the Wk. # it was due

    • state the type of paper

    • add your first name and last initial
      (unless your full name already shows in your return email address)

    • for example:
      Hum 1110 Wk. 10 Comments Rachel S.

  • delivery to my IHCC office, B-136  by Thurs. 3:30 pm (immediately inside the main doors of the business building, make a hard right--my mailbox is beside my office door, in alphabetical order with others)

  • delivery by mail with a postmark of Thurs. (Richard Jewell, 410 Groveland Ave., #401, Mpls., MN 55403, or to me, B-136, at IHCC's address)

  • Also, please write your assignment in the text of the email, and not as an attachment.  This is because it takes me longer to process attachments, especially if I were getting dozens of them each week.

  • You also can write your weekly paper in MSWord first, then copy and paste it into your email message. 

  • delivery by Friday noon in person to my home address near the Guthrie, the Walker, and Loring Park in Minneapolis (see "Contact Richard" for more info).

Assignments Due for the First Week:

(a)   Buy the textbook materials. They are listed in this website in (1) the "Syllabus," (2) The "Readings & Resources" page, and (3) in the "Homework" page. 

(b) Read the online "Welcome!" on the home page, the "Syllabus (Course Summary)," and if you are in the fully-online section, the Starting Online" page.   (Note: the Syllabus is just a repetition, in short form, of everything else in this course website--you don't need to read it unless you want a brief summary of the course materials or if you are undecided about taking/staying in the course.)
(c)
  Skim through the course Web site and the course Bulletin Board.  You can always access the course Web site by starting at http://Richard.Jewell.net and then going to "Courses, " where you can click on our course name and number.  Also get your online bulletin-board (discussion-board) account started for bulletin-board classes: go to D2L.  

(d) Write a "Hello-Richard" Journal (300+ w.): tell me about your experience with and/or interest in the humanities: ancient, Greek, Roman, medieval, and renaissance culture, civilizations, religions, art, etc..  Also, have you have a composition course, yet?  In addition, if you haven't yet used up your 300+ w., it would be fun to hear about your education so far, your life right now, etc. 
(e)
Due in first week or so of term: Turn in photo & class info.  Please use the form I provide on the first night in class.  If you somehow miss class, you may print out the form from the "Student Info+Photo Sheet" page (simply close the page when you are done, and you will be back on this page).  Delivery method: All classes (including fully-online sections), please deliver this to me physically, either by bringing it to class, dropping it off in my office mailbox, or mailing it to me at home (Richard Jewell, 410 Groveland Ave., #401, Mpls., MN 55403) or at IHCC. (However, you may deliver it to me by email attachment if--and only if--you are able to electronically add your photo to the place where the photo goes on p. 1. Please do NOT send me a separate photo!)  

(f) Read the "Table of Contents" of your chosen thick book--Lamm, Fiero (thick book, not the thin one), or Witt.  Also, quickly skim (for a few minutes) the "Index" and, if there is one, the "Glossary" (definitions) in the back.  If you're reading the Witt, also look over the "Chronicle of Events" (pp. xiv-xxiii).
(g) Due in first week or so of term: If you missed the in-person first night of class, then write a summary of the website:
 summarize the website for 600 w., writing about 70-90 w. of summary for each web page listed in the top navigation bar ("Home, Wkly. Asgnmt., Textbooks, HowToDoHmwrk. Grading, Attendance, D2L, FAQ's,  Records") and email the overall summary to me (for two X's of attendance, since this is a replacement of our first "Event").
(h) Prepare and submit by Thursday of next week all of the assignments listed as being due for Week 2, below.

CLASS ACTIVITIES:

- Introductions: Summarize website or attend an in-person intro one evening in an IHCC computer lab B-143 in "Business" building. (See the very top of this page under "2017 Group Field Trips and In-person Events" under "1." for the exact night and room number.

ONLINE ACTIVITIES: Please go to D2L to get started and to see what online class activities are due.  (Please remember that online classes are classes requiring attendance; they are not homework.) Also check your email for the weekly email from Richard (often sent Saturday or Sunday) and other Hum 1110 emails.

Return to top.
                

 Week 2: The Integrated Humanities; Early Culture  (See "General Schedule," above, for dates.)

              

ASSIGNMENTS DUE THURS. OF WEEK 2 (Assignments are due Thurs. of each week without exception for daytime and FOL sections--or the night of class for night classes.  See above for delivery methods.): 

 

Note #1, delivery by email: please write your email's "Subject" line title as follows:  

  • start with Hum 1110

  • add the Wk. # it was due

  • state the type of paper

  • add your first name and last initial
    (unless your full name already shows in your return email address)

  • for example:
    Hum 1110 Wk. 10 Comments Rachel S.

Note #2: Also, please write your assignment in the text of an email, and not as an attachment.  This is because it takes me longer to process attachments.  You also can write your weekly paper in MSWord first, then copy and paste it into your email message.)  

  • Read Lamm "Prologue" and Chapter 1
    OR Fiero, 6th and 7th ed., pre-"Introduction" plus "Introduction," pp. xii & 1-15, and Chapter 1.  (Or Fiero 5th ed. or 4th ed., pp. xv-xvi & 2-16)
    OR Witt, the two introductions (pp. xxiv-xxvii and pp. 1-5) and Chapter 1
    (Note: you don't have to read the "Readings"--the literature examples--each week, just the main text.)
    OR
    If you haven't purchased and received your Lamm, Witt, or Fiero textbook yet, THEN READ BOTH of these ONLINE SAMPLES for Week 2 (and get your book by Wk. 3!):
         Click here and read pp. 1-12 of Lamm.
         Click here and read Witt p. xviii-p. 5.

  • Read Experiencing the Humanities chapter "1. Introduction." 

  • Write "Comments": 150 words total (see Syllabus), with at least 50+ words on each book from which you may need to read.  Do the larger amount of comments on the larger assigned reading: e.g., this week, do 150 w. total with about 100+ w. on Lamm and at least 50 w. on ExperiencingPlease be sure to label your writings in the upper-right (not the upper-left) corner with Your Name, "Hum 1110," "Week # 2," & "Comments."  

NOTE: Below is an example of how to do the "Comments" each week.

ONLINE ACTIVITIES: Please go to D2L to see what online activities are due. Also check your email for the weekly email from Richard (often sent on Saturday or Sunday) and other Hum 1110 emails.
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Example of How to Do the Weekly Email Comments
(Shown by permission of Michelle F.)

From: Michelle F.
Sent: Monday, September 10, 2017 7:17 PM
To: Richard Jewell
Subject: Hum 1110 Wk. 3 Comments, Michelle F.

Fiero book, Chapter 1:

Ancient Egyptian civilization sprang up on the banks of the Nile River and was united by a single ruler around 3150 B.C.E. Ancient Egyptians were very religious and worshipped more than 2000 gods. Pharaohs were considered to be the living emissary of their greatest god, the sun god. The famous pyramids at Gizeh were constructed between 2600 and 2500 B.C.E. as tombs for leaders or persons of prominence. Egyptian religion and burial reflects a strong belief in the afterlife. Most of what remains of Egyptian art is found in tomb paintings and architecture. These pictures tell us about the people and their culture and seem to depict an orderly society confidently trusting in deity.

Experiencing the Humanities, Chapter 2:

With the invention of television and the widespread broadcasting that soon followed, our nation—even our world—has become more of a global community than ever before. People geographically separated now have things in common. Experts and intellectuals suggest that humans can be divided into two classes—loners and socializers. Most people exhibit some traits of each class. Experts disagree about how much of our personhood is determined by our genetics and how much by our environment. Societies are also often divided into classes. Income, education, level of culture, and many other characteristics must be considered in classifying a person or people group in a society. We pursue culture personally when we appreciate a good conversation, a well-made movie, or a moving piece of music.

Experiencing the Humanities, Chapter 3:

When studying history, we must gather information from primary or secondary sources, since we cannot be present in time past. Primary sources have first-hand information. Secondary sources are interpretations of first-hand information and may distort or enhance our understanding. Many—even most—historical counts are incomplete. This can cause those on the receiving ends of the accounts to come to some partially informed and therefore inaccurate conclusions about history. Two theories of historical interpretation are the “single events” theory, which focuses on standout events or individuals, and the “process of events” theory, which explores the chronology of events. Both lend insight into history. Feminists are vying for a larger representation for women in the chronicles of history, and minorities, too, claim under-representation in the history books.
    

  
Return to top.
                

 Week 3: Egypt; the Study of Cultures  (See "General Schedule," above, for dates.)

          

ASSIGNMENTS DUE THURS. OF WEEK 3 (Assignments are due THURS. of each week without exception--see above for delivery methods): 

You may deliver the assignments in person or by mail (see above).  If you deliver by email, please write your email's "Subject" line title as follows:  

  • start with Hum 1110

  • add the Wk. # it was due

  • state the type of paper

  • add your first name and last initial
    (unless your full name already shows in your return email address)

  • for example:
    Hum 1110 Wk. 10 Comments Rachel S.

Also, please remember to write your assignment as--or copy and paste them into--the text of an email message; please do not send attachments, as they take me much longer to process.

  • Read Lamm Chapter 2
    OR Fiero, 6th and 7th ed., Chapter 2.  (Or Fiero, old 5th or 4th ed., chapter 1)
    OR Witt Chapter 2
    (Note: you don't have to read the "Readings"--the literature examples--each week, just the main text.)

  • Read Experiencing the Humanities chapters "2. Society," and "3. History."

  • Write "Comments" (150+ w. total: 50+ w. on each of the three assigned chptrs.--2 in Experiencing & 1 in the other).

  • Write, on a separate sheet of paper, your 1st "Practice Activity," 300+ w. (or alternate) (see Syllabus).

  • Please be sure to label your writings in the upper-right (not the upper-left) corner with Your Name, "Hum 1110," "Week # 3," & Type of Paper.

EVENT B NEXT WEEK: Visit to Art Museum. See top area of this page for full details.

ONLINE ACTIVITIES: Please go to D2L to see what online activities are due. Also check your email for the weekly email from Richard (often sent on Saturday or Sunday) and other Hum 1110 emails.
---

Example of How to Do a Practice Paper
(Shown by Permission of the Student, "Anonymous")

  
From:
anonymous@ihcc.edu
Sent: Tuesday, September 14, 2010 9:44 PM
To: Richard Jewell
Subject: Hum 1110, Wk. 3 Practice Paper #1, Anonymous S.

I decided to study the sonnets of Petrarch and how to write a sonnet -- I thought it would be different to study some writings.  I started with reading a non-required part of our textbook The Humanistic Tradition and also used a website to learn more.  

Practice Papers #1 & #2
600+ w.
2 readings--book & website:
Fiero pp. 21-26 &
from http://petrarch.petersadlon.com

Sonnets and the Life of Petrarch, the “Father of Humanism”
–What a Sonnet Is and How to Write It  

The Petrarchan Sonnet

Petrarch (1304-1374) is considered "the first writer of the Renaissance."  The Petrarchan Sonnet consists of fourteen lines that are broken down into two stanzas: an eight-line octave and the six-line sestet.  In the octave portion, a problem or dilemma is presented, which is later worked through and solved in the sestet.  Each line is written in iambic pentameter, ten syllables per line with the stress on every second beat: daDUM daDUM daDUM daDUM daDUM.

Petrarch love conventions 

The poet (male) addresses a lady (corresponding to Petrarch's Laura).  She often has a classical name like Stella or Delia.  The poet-lover praises his mistress, the object and image of Love, with praise for her superlative qualities using descriptions of beauty supplied by Petrarch: "golden hair," "ivory breast," "ruby lips." the poet employs contradictory and oxymoronic phrases and images: freezing and burning, binding freedom.  The poet-lover dwells only on the subjective experience, hence on the misery of being in love: thus the occasional appearance of the conventional invocation to sleep to allay the pain (insomnia poems).  The poet disclaims credit for poetic merits: the inspiration of his mistress is what makes the poetry good, he claims.  The poet promises to protect the youth of his lady and his own love against time (through the immortalizing poetry itself).

As Petrarchan conventions became established, a simultaneous inclination to sound original emerged. Later sonnet developments included: a replacement of the Petrarchan metaphor (expressing the unity of all things) with a simile drawn from common observation and direct perception.  An emphasis in mode upon persuasive reasoning.  The inclusion of physical love with the platonic.  An increased self-consciousness about the act of composing itself (love poetry about love poetry).

Petrarch life events

Petrarch was born on July 20th 1304 in Aerzzo to Pietro di Parenzo di Garzo (Ser Petracco dell'Incisa) and Eletta Canigiani.  In 1305 Petrarch’s family moves to Ancisa. In 1316 Petrarch goes to school in Montpellier. In 1319 Petrarch’s mother dies and in 1320 he goes to Bologna to study law. In 1326 Petrarch’s father dies and he returns to Avignon. He quits studying law because it was his father’s wishes.

On April 6, 1327 Petrarch, sees Laure de Noves for the first time at Easter mass. She is the inspiration of 366 poems of his Canzoniere. 1337 Petrarch’s first child, Giovanni is born. 1341 Petrarch is crowned poet laureate in Rome. Petrarch's speech calls on a rebirth of classical wisdom and poetry. He develops the idea of the laurel being the symbol for poetic and literary immortality. April 1348 Laura dies either from the black plague or suffered its worst epidemic of cinsumption. 1361 Giovanni, Petrarch's son, dies of the plague.  1368 Petrarch's grandson dies.

July 19, 1374 Petrarch is found dead by his daughter Francesca, slumped over his desk as he worked on yet another great work.  He died with a pen in his hand, and Laura in his heart. He was buried in the parish church. Six years later, his remains were transferred to a sarcophagus built by his son-in-law.

What is a Sonnet?

It is fourteen lines in iambic pentameter. The sonnet was invented in Italy during the mid-thirteenth century by Giacomo da Lentini, but the Italian Sonnet itself was honed and perfected by the humanist poet Petrarch.  In modern English poetry lines of poetry are measured not just by the number of strong stresses, but English poetry uses something called “metrical feet.” Identifying these feet and sorting out a line of poetry with them is called “scansion.”  Every syllable gets either a weak or a strong stress, and in cases where words have more than one syllable, it’s simply a matter of pronunciation.

Writing a Sonnet

Understanding how the two types of sonnets are formatted (The Petrarchan Sonnet)—and then broken down line by line—is an easy way to learn how to write them.

What you will need: You must have a quiet place to write; a rhyming dictionary and thesaurus; and pens or pencils and paper, or a laptop or desktop computer.  

The writing process: Choose a subject to write about.  Break the subject into two parts: a proposition/dilemma and a solution. While writing, count out the beats of each line and pay close attention to the rhythm.  In the first quatrain, lay the subject out for the reader, following an a-b-a-b rhyme pattern. The second quatrain is a deeper look into the subject. This stanza is written in a c-d-c-d end-rhyme pattern.  Turn everything around with the "volta" in line nine of the third quatrain. Often the word "but" is employed to signal the turning point.  Follow the e-f-e-f end-rhyme pattern in this quatrain.  The couplet is comprised of two lines and concludes with a solution to the issue explored through the body of the poem. Both lines end on the same rhyme represented by g-g.  Practice is the key to conquering the sonnet.  

Breaking the rules: One of the beautiful things about poetry is that it is a personal expression for every poet. For some poets following such a rigid format might become discouraging, but there is a simple rule that writers and poets share: you have to know the rules before you can break them. Once you understand the basics of the sonnet, such as structure, meter, rhythm and rhyme you can get creative and really make a statement.
 

 
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 Week 4: Early Greece   (See "General Schedule," above, for dates.) 

        

ASSIGNMENTS DUE THURS. OF WEEK 4:

  • Read Lamm Chapter 3-4 (you may skip pp. 79-86)
    OR Fiero, 6th and 7th ed., 1st half of chapter 4).  (Or Fiero, old 5th or 4th ed., chapter 2)
    OR Witt Chapter 3
    (Note: you don't have to read the "Readings"--the literature examples--each week, just the main text.) 

  • Read Experiencing chapters "4. Mythology" and "11. Performing Arts."  

  • Write Comments (150+ w. divided evenly among the 3-4 assigned chapters), and a 2nd Practice Activity.

ONLINE ACTIVITIES: Please go to D2L to see what online activities are due. Also check your email for the weekly email from Richard (often sent on Saturday or Sunday) and other Hum 1110 emails.

ALTERNATIVE OR ADDITIONAL FIELD TRIP ON YOUR OWN: Attend an authentic medieval fair for 3 hrs. & 20 min. (3:20). You may count driving time of up to 1 hr. as part of that time. (You may do more for extra credit): usually this is held for one day on a Sunday in late Sept. or early Oct., approximately 11 am-4 pm, in Caponi Park in Eagan. It's free, but a $5 donation is suggested (but not required if you can't afford it). See www.caponiartpark.org/programs/medievalfair .

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 Week 5: Golden Age of Greece  (See "General Schedule," above, for dates.)

ASSIGNMENTS DUE THURS. OF WEEK 5:  

ONLINE ACTIVITIES: Please go to D2L to see what online activities are due. Also check your email for the weekly email from Richard (often sent on Saturday or Sunday) and other Hum 1110 emails.

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 Week 6: Greek Influences  (See "General Schedule," above, for dates.) 

           

ASSIGNMENTS DUE THURS. OF WEEK 6:  

  • Read Lamm Chapter 6. (And skip the other literary readings, but DO read "Cave Allegory" p. 179--and do a separately subtitled 50+ w. of Comments on it.)
    OR Fiero, 6th and 7th ed., Chapter 5.  (Or Fiero, old 5th or 4th ed., chapter 5). (If Plato's cave allegory is in your edition of Fiero, please read it and do a separately subtitled 50+ w. of Comments on it. If it's not in your edition of Fiero, then find it online and do a separately subtitled 50+ w. of Comments on it.)
    OR Witt Chapter 5. (And skip the other literary readings, but DO read "Plato, The Allegory of the Cave," p. 152 and do a separately subtitled 50+ w. of Comments on it.
    For help understanding the above, try Googling "Plato Allegory of the Cave" or "Plato Cave Allegory."

  • READ Experiencing chapter "5. Philosophy."  
    (Note: you don't have to read the "Readings"--the literature examples--each week, just the main text.)
    Write
    Comments and Practice Activity.

ONLINE ACTIVITIES: Please go to D2L to see what online activities are due. Also check your email for the weekly email from Richard (often sent on Saturday or Sunday) and other Hum 1110 emails.

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 Week 7: Greek Art (or Fiero--Early Christian Art)  (See "General Schedule," above, for dates.)

ASSIGNMENTS DUE THURS. OF WEEK 7:  

  • Read Lamm Chapter 7
    OR Fiero, 6th and 7th ed., chapter 9).  (Or Fiero, old 5th ed., ch. 9; or 4th ed., chapter 6)
    OR Witt, selections in Homer's Iliad (71-80) or Odyssey (80-87). 
    OR online Books 3-4 of Homer's Iliad from the web (See Wk. 5 for a link.)
    (Note: You likely will get more out of reading Homer if you read him out loud, like his  stories originally were meant to be read, to a friend or just to yourself in a normal out-loud voice.)

  • Read Experiencing chapters "8. All the Arts" and "9. Elements of the Arts."  
    (Note: you don't have to read the "Readings"--the literature examples--each week, just the main text.

  • Write Comments and Practice Activity.

ONLINE ACTIVITIES: Please go to D2L to see what online activities are due. Also check your email for the weekly email from Richard (often sent on Saturday or Sunday) and other Hum 1110 emails.

EVENT B NEXT WEEK--Visit #1 to Art Museum:
 -
Show up next week (on Thurs. evening) in the lobby of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts (MIA) at 6:30 pm (tours start at 6:45 pm) for 2 docent-led tours for a total of 2 & 1/2  hrs. Times: 6:30-9:00 pm. Cost: free (but parking is either free on the street or $3+ in parking ramp). To get credit, write 200+ w. per tour (i.e., 400+ w. per evening visit). (You'll get credit for tour times, a short break, a short waiting time at the beginning, and for travel time--or roughly 200 min. per visit.) See near the top of this page for more details and alternatives.

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 Week 8: Rome  (See "General Schedule," above, for dates.)


ASSIGNMENTS DUE THURS. OF WEEK
8:  

  • Read Lamm Chapters 8-9 (choose just 7+ pp. to read in 249-280)
    OR Fiero, 6th and 7th ed., Chapter 6.  (Or Fiero, old 5th ed., ch. 6; or 4th ed., chapters 7 & 10).
    OR Witt Chapter 6
    (Note: you don't have to read the "Readings"--the literature examples--each week, just the main text.)

  • (No Experiencing). 

  • Write Comments and Practice Activity.

ONLINE ACTIVITIES: Please go to D2L to see what online activities are due. Also check your email for the weekly email from Richard (often sent on Saturday or Sunday) and other Hum 1110 emails.

EVENT B THIS WEEK--Visit #1 to Art Museum:
 -
Show up Thurs. evening in the lobby of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts (MIA) at 6:30 pm (tours start at 6:45 pm) for 2 docent-led tours for a total of 2 & 1/2  hrs. Times: 6:30-9:00 pm. Cost: free (but parking is either free on the street or $3+ in parking ramp). To get credit, write 200+ w. per tour (i.e., 400+ w. per evening visit). (You'll get credit for tour times, a short break, a short waiting time at the beginning, and for travel time--or roughly 200 min. per visit.) See near the top of this page for more details and alternatives.

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 Week 9: Jews, Early Christians, and Muslims   (See "General Schedule," above, for dates.)


ASSIGNMENTS DUE THURS. OF WEEK
9:  

  • Read Lamm Chapters 10-11
    OR Fiero, 6th and 7th ed., Chapter 8.  (Or Fiero, old 5th or 4th ed., chapter 8)
    OR Witt, Chapter 7
    (Note: you don't have to read the "Readings"--the literature examples--each week, just the main text.)

  • Read Experiencing chapter "6. "Religion."  

  • Write Comments and Practice Activity.

ONLINE ACTIVITIES: Please go to D2L to see what online activities are due. Also check your email for the weekly email from Richard (often sent on Saturday or Sunday) and other Hum 1110 emails.

EVENT D: Wks. 10-11 (confirmed): Next week and the week after, see the play The Hollow: A Murder Mystery Fri. or Sat., Oct. 27-28 or Nov. 3-4 at Inver Hills College, 7:30 pm, in the Fine Arts building's theater. Plays typically run 2 to 2 & 1/2  hrs. with a 15-min. intermission (plan on not leaving at the intermission!). For more details, see "EVENTS D & E" in "EVENTS" at the top of this page.

        To get credit, send 400+ words about the play--and please include something about the actors' real names and how they did, so that I know you attended the IHCC play rather than watched a movie. (This event may be replaced by any live play at a college or professional theater elsewhere this semester, or by doing an equivalent amount of extra credit.)

EVENT E: Wk. 11 (confirmed): Next week on Friday, Oct. 27, the class is going to Romeo and Juliet at the Guthrie Theater in downtown Minneapolis. Show up by 7-7:15; the play starts at 7:30. You must have reserved a ticket ahead of time with Richard to see this. Shakespeare plays typically run 2 & 1/2  hrs. with a 15-min. intermission (plan on not leaving at the intermission!). For more details, see "EVENTS D & E" in "EVENTS" at the top of this page.

        To get credit, send 400+ words about the play--and please include something about the actors' real names and how they did, so that I know you attended the IHCC play rather than watched a movie. (This event may be replaced by any live play at a college or professional theater elsewhere this semester, or by doing an equivalent amount of extra credit.)

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 Week 10: Medieval Ages   (See "General Schedule," above, for dates.)

ASSIGNMENTS DUE THURS. OF WEEK 10:  

  • Read Lamm Chapters 12-13 (Skip 355-372, & choose just 10+ pp. to read in 386-415.)
    OR Fiero, 6th and 7th ed., chapter 10-11.  (Or Fiero, old 5th ed., chapter 10-11; or Fiero, old 4th ed., chapter 11-12)
    OR Witt Chapters 8-9

  • Read Experiencing chapter "10. Visual Art." 

  • Write Comments (150 w. w/50+ w. on lit reading), and Practice Activity.

ONLINE ACTIVITIES: Please go to D2L to see what online activities are due. Also check your email for the weekly email from Richard (often sent on Saturday or Sunday) and other Hum 1110 emails.

EVENT D: Wk. 11 (confirmed): This week on Friday, Oct. 27, the class is going to Romeo and Juliet at the Guthrie Theater in downtown Minneapolis. Show up by 7-7:15; the play starts at 7:30. You must have reserved a ticket ahead of time with Richard to see this. Shakespeare plays typically run 2 & 1/2  hrs. with a 15-min. intermission (plan on not leaving at the intermission!). For more details, see "EVENTS D & E" in "EVENTS" at the top of this page.

        To get credit, send 400+ words about the play--and please include something about the actors' real names and how they did, so that I know you attended the IHCC play rather than watched a movie. (This event may be replaced by any live play at a college or professional theater elsewhere this semester, or by doing an equivalent amount of extra credit.)

EVENT E: Wks. 10-11 (confirmed): This week or next week, see the play The Hollow: A Murder Mystery Fri. or Sat., Oct. 27-28 or Nov. 3-4 at Inver Hills College, 7:30 pm, in the Fine Arts building's theater. Plays typically run 2 to 2 & 1/2  hrs. with a 15-min. intermission (plan on not leaving at the intermission!). For more details, see "EVENTS D & E" in "EVENTS" at the top of this page.

        To get credit, send 400+ words about the play--and please include something about the actors' real names and how they did, so that I know you attended the IHCC play rather than watched a movie. (This event may be replaced by any live play at a college or professional theater elsewhere this semester, or by doing an equivalent amount of extra credit.)

EVENT F NEXT WEEK: Visit #2 to Art Museum:
 -
Next week, show up Thurs. evening in the lobby of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts (MIA) at 6:30 pm (tours start at 6:45 pm) for one docent-led tour and one self-tour for a total of 2 & 1/2  hrs. Times: 6:30-9:00 pm. Cost: free (but parking is either free on the street or $3+ in parking ramp). To get credit, write 200+ w. per tour (i.e., 400+ w. per evening visit). (You'll get credit for tour times, a short break, a short waiting time at the beginning, and for travel time--or roughly 200 min. per visit.) See near the top of this page for more details and alternatives.

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 Week 11: Medieval Art, Music, &/or Love  (See "General Schedule," above, for dates.)

ASSIGNMENTS DUE THURS. OF WEEK 11:  

  • Read Lamm Chapters 14-15, and Lamm's "Appendix"  on music
    OR Fiero, 6th and 7th ed., Chapters 12-13.  (Or Fiero, old 5th ed., chapters 12-13; or Fiero, old 4th ed., chapters 9 & 13)
    OR Witt Chapter 10; and your choice of just one chapter from Chapters 11-15

  • (no Experiencing this week)

  • Write Comments and Practice Activity.

EVENT F THIS WEEK--Visit #2 to Art Museum:
 -
Show up Thursday evening in the lobby of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts (MIA) at 6:30 pm (tours start at 6:45 pm) for 1 docent-led tour and 1 self-tour for a total of 2 & 1/2  hrs. Times: 6:30-9:00 pm. Cost: free (but parking is either free on the street or $3+ in parking ramp). To get credit, write 200+ w. per tour (i.e., 400+ w. per evening visit). (You'll get credit for tour times, a short break, a short waiting time at the beginning, and for travel time--or roughly 200 min. per visit.) See near the top of this page for more details and alternatives.

EVENT E: Wks. 10-11: See the play The Hollow: A Murder Mystery Fri. or Sat., Oct. 27-28 or Nov. 3-4 at Inver Hills College, 7:30 pm, in the Fine Arts building's theater. Plays typically run 2 to 2 & 1/2  hrs. with a 15-min. intermission (plan on not leaving at the intermission!). For more details, see "EVENTS D & E" in "EVENTS" at the top of this page.

        To get credit, send 400+ words about a play--and please include something about the actors' real names and how they did, so that I know you attended the IHCC play rather than watched a movie. (This event may be replaced by any live play at a college or professional theater elsewhere this semester, or by doing an equivalent amount of extra credit.)

ONLINE ACTIVITIES: Please go to D2L to see what online activities are due. Also check your email for the weekly email from Richard (often sent on Saturday or Sunday) and other Hum 1110 emails.

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 Week 12: Renaissance, Part 1.  (See "General Schedule," above, for dates.)

         

ASSIGNMENTS DUE THURS. OF WEEK 12:  

  • Read (everyone): Fiero chaps. 15 & 16 (4th, 5th, 6th, or 7th ed., from Fiero's Book 3)

  • Read Experiencing chapter "14. Future of the Arts."  

  • Write Comments and Practice Activity.

ONLINE ACTIVITIES: Please go to D2L to see what online activities are due. Also check your email for the weekly email from Richard (often sent on Saturday or Sunday) and other Hum 1110 emails.

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 Week 13: Renaissance, Part 2  (See "General Schedule," above, for dates.)

  

ASSIGNMENTS DUE THURS. OF WEEK 13:  

NOTE: Starting next week (Wk. 14), no written assignments or D2L attendance may be late: you must have Wk. 14's homework and D2L turned in by the end of that week. You must also turn in all extra credit and any "fixed" papers by the end of Wk. 14, next week.

  • Read (everyone): Fiero, 5th, 6th, & 7th ed., chaps. 17 & 18, but don't read all of Ch. 18--read only about the first 8 pp. of it, and stop at the beginning of "African Literature".  (If you have the old 4th ed. of Fiero, read chapter 17 only.)

  • Read Experiencing chapter "13. Literature."

  • Write Comments and Practice Activity.
    ---
    ALSO:

  • Read our web page How to Do Papers near the end about how to do the Final Homework Analysis Paper.  Suggestions: Copy the directions onto a Word or email document and print it.

  • Sign up for a consultation (in person at Inver or a coffeehouse, by phone, or by Skype) in Week 15 to ask questions or get help, if you wish. Having a consultation gives you 2 X's of attendance credit.  Not having one means you will have to make up those two X's, or lose those two X's of attendance.   For times, see the bottom of the Web site's home page.

ONLINE ACTIVITIES: Please go to D2L to see what online activities are due. Also check your email for the weekly email from Richard (often sent on Saturday or Sunday) and other Hum 1110 emails.

Field Trips--Attend Museums and Plays on Four Evenings (two Thursdays; the other two may be on Thursday, Friday, or Saturday, sometimes by vote). All field trips may be done by online or individualized replacements for those who can't attend the in-person events. (For a list of the trips, see the very top of this schedule. When they have been scheduled, they will be added here and above.)

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 Week 14: Renaissance, Part 3; Term Paper Draft I.  (See "General Schedule," above, for dates.)

                                  
ASSIGNMENTS DUE THURS. OF WEEK 14:  

NOTE: By the end of this week, no written assignments or D2L attendance may be late: you must have Wk. 14's homework and D2L turned in by the end of this week. You must also turn in all extra credit and any "fixed" papers by the end of this week.

Last Week of Textbook Readings:

  • (1) All Extra Credit and "fixed" papers due. (2) No more late papers. You must turn in the papers due this week, Wk. 14, in Wk. 14--no more 1-wk. extensions are allowed. Also, all extra credit/make ups and "fixed" papers are due this week.

  • Read Fiero, chap. 19 (everyone; 4th, 5th, 6th, or 7th ed.) (No late pprs this week!).

  • Read Experiencing chapters "7. Rise of Reason" and "15. Conclusion: Linking the Humanities." 

  • Write Comments and Practice Activity.

  • Read our web page How to Do Papers near the end about how to do the Final Homework Analysis Paper, 900+ w. with quotations.  Suggestion: (1) Copy the directions onto a Word or email document and print it. (2) Use the printed copy to start thinking about what you're going to write about.

  • Sign up for an optional consultation (in person at Inver or a coffeehouse, by phone, or by Skype) in Week 15, if you wish.  For times, see the bottom of the Web site's home page.

ONLINE ACTIVITIES: Please go to D2L to see what online activities are due. Also check your email for the weekly email from Richard (often sent on Saturday or Sunday) and other Hum 1110 emails. No more late D2L messages will be allowed: the Wk. 14 D2L messages are due this week--Wk. 14.

Field Trips--Attend Museums and Plays on Four Evenings (two Thursdays; the other two may be on Thursday, Friday, or Saturday, sometimes by vote). All field trips may be done by online or individualized replacements for those who can't attend the in-person events. (For a list of the trips, see the very top of this schedule. When they have been scheduled, they will be added here and above.)

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 Week 15: Individual Conferences with Richard; Writing & Revising the Final Paper.   (See "General Schedule," above, for dates.)

               

ASSIGNMENTS DUE THURS. OF WEEK 15:

  • Read a 2nd time our web page How to Do Papers near the end about how to do the Final Homework Analysis Paper.  Suggestions: Copy the directions onto a Word or email document and print it. Start writing it--a rough draft--and/or find your quotations.

  • Write
     -- final Practice Activity: must be turned in by Th. (no late pprs. this week!)

     -- a "Goodbye Richard" Class Journal of 300+ words (due Wk. 15 or 16). Describe
    what you got out of the class, what you would suggest I do for future classes, and just a general goodbye. Like other papers, I do not show the Journal to others without your permission. Also, I do check them off before the end of the class to give you the credit, but I do not read them until after grades have been turned in--which allows you to write whatever you'd like without worrying whether your journal will affect your grade. I don't usually reply to them--but I usually really enjoy reading them!

     -- As above, start writing your Final Homework Analysis Paper of 900+ w.--a rough draft--and/or find your quotations.

  • Attend an optional consultation in Week 15, if you wish (in person at Inver or a coffeehouse, by phone, or by Skype). Note that it is worth 2 X’s, and if you do not attend, you either lose the two X’s or must replace them with 200 min. of extra credit (which you may do if you mark it as “replacement for consultation” and email it to me by the homework deadline of Week 15). For times, see the bottom of our Web site's home page. These consultations are X’ed on the Attendance Records.

ONLINE ACTIVITIES: There is no D2L for Week 15. (It is replaced by the 2 X's for having a consultation with Richard.) Also check your email for the weekly email from Richard (often sent on Saturday or Sunday) and other Hum 1110 emails.

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  Week 16: Individual Conferences with Richard.  

               

ASSIGNMENTS DUE THURS. OF WEEK 16:  

  • Read/review a 3rd time our web page How to Do Papers near the end about how to do the Final Homework Analysis Paper.  Suggestions: Copy the directions onto a Word or email document and print it.

  • Write
     -- a "Goodbye Richard" Class Journal of 300+ words (due Wk. 15 or 16). Describe what you got
    out of the class, what you would suggest I do for future classes, and just a general goodbye. Like other papers, I do not show the Journal to others without your permission. Also, I do check them off before the end of the class to give you the credit, but I do not read them until after grades have been turned in--which allows you to write whatever you'd like without worrying whether your journal will affect your grade.
     -- Final Homework Analysis Paper of 900+ w. (due Wk. 16 or 17). In Wk. 16, f
    inish writing, at the least, a rough draft of your Final Homework Analysis Paper, and you should know which quotations you're going to use.
         If you finish the paper this week, you may send it to me and also ask me how it looks. Then, if it needs something more, I can return it to your for fixing. (If you wait until next class week to send it to me, I will accept it exactly as is--not time for me to send it back to you to fix.)
         Please send the paper by email
    attachment--do NOT send it in the text of an email. You also may drop off a physical copy. (If you want me to let you know whether it looks okay, then the physical copy must be dropped off by Thurs. 4:30 pm in my office, or by Sat. midnight at my home. For submitting at my home, see "Due Dates & Delivery" in How to Do Papers, and/or go to www.RichardJewell.org and see "OFFICE/EMAIL/PHONE/HOME."
         Are
    there any special preparations before turning it in?  Yes!!!  Please mark the quotations in bold simply so I can find all of them easily. (Or if you turn in a physical copy, you can do the same, or simply handwrite a big "Q" in the left margin beside each quotation.)

ONLINE ACTIVITIES: Please go to D2L to see what online activities are due. Also check your email for the weekly email from Richard (often sent on Saturday or Sunday) and other Hum 1110 emails.

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Week 17--Final Exams Week: Turning in the Final Homework Analysis Paper  
(See "General Schedule," above, for dates.  NOTE: Exams often run on an odd schedule and not Monday-Saturday.)

  
ASSIGNMENTS DUE THURS. OF WEEK 17:  

  • Read/review: Before turning in your Final Homework Analysis Paper, it is a good idea to go over the requirements again, briefly, to make sure you have met them all. They are at our web page How to Do Papers near the end.
        

  • Write: Turn in your final Homework Analysis Paper of 900+ w. (If you are finishing it this week, there are no more options for further revision.)
         Are there any special preparations before turning it in?  Yes!!!  Please mark the quotations in bold simply so I can find all of them easily. (Or if you turn in a physical copy, you can do the same, or simply handwrite a big "Q" in the left margin beside each quotation.)
         When is it due? It is due at the end of finals week:
     -
     
    If  turned in by hand at Inver, then it is due under (not on) my office door
        by 
    Thurs., Dec. 17, by 4:30 pm
    .
     -  If turned in in an email or by email attachment, it is due by
    Fri. midnight, 
        Dec. 18.

     -  If brought to my home, it is due by
    Sat., Dec. 17
    by midnight. If you drop it
         off there, email me to tell me it is there (unless you hand it to me). To submit
         at my home, see web page "OFFICE/EMAIL/PHONE/HOME" in 
         www.RichardJewell.org.

ONLINE ACTIVITIES: None.           
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GOODBYE, EVERYONE! Here at the end of this course, I'd like to thank you for your time and effort.  I'd also like to say that hopefully, if this course worked well, then you may have more questions than answers--or at least more ways to ask questions.  The purpose of a liberal arts education is not so much to impart facts as it is to teach a way of questioning and thinking more deeply about life in general and its many subjects.  I wish you good luck and enjoyable thinking in your future.  And if you enjoyed the course, please recommend it to your friends and others!

-End of Weekly Schedule-

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Submitting weekly papers by email?  

(1) Please make them in-text--in the text of your email itself--not attached. That means you should simply write them as an email message or, if you already have them on a word processing file, you should use your mouse and your "Edit" function to mark, then "Copy," and then "Paste" them into a regular email message. 

(2) To help me keep your paper separate from my regular email, use this subject title: Course #  & section #, the Week Due, Assignment Type, and Name+Initial: e.g., "1111-99 Wk. 5 Comments Sue J.,"  

(3) Always keep a copy until after the end of the course when you've received your course grade. 

(4) If you send me an email message (other than homework), please write "Question" in the subject line so I'll open it right away.  Be sure your full name is somewhere in the email, too.  And in the first several weeks, please remind me which course and section you're in.  I ask this because I receive several dozen homework assignments each week by email, and I only open homework once or twice per week.  (5-04)

Return to top.
                

Schedule of Consultations about Final Paper/Project

  
The consultations schedule is at the bottom of the home page.  Please click here to go to it
    

Return to top.
                

                                   

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Links on This Page
Click on what you want.

Week by Week, 1-17:

Week  #1        #2          #3

Week  #4        #5          #6

Week  #7        #8          #9

Week #10      #11        #12

Week #13      #14        #15

Week #16      #17-Exams

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Popular Shortcuts

Map of Campus

Inver Hills College Calendar

Directions to Hamline U. Theater, (f. '16)

Directions to New Guthrie Theater (10-07)

Directions to Minneapolis Institute of Arts (Mia) (9-17)

Directions to Mn. Science Museum

FOL Records

Make Up & Extra Cr. - Basics

Make Up & Extra Cr. - Activities

Schedule of Consultations about Term Paper

Links to the Humanities

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)         

Contact Richard
    

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Useful Tips for
Taking This Course

How To Use This Page: Your first time here, look carefully at the "General Schedule in Brief" to the left so you have a feel for the stages of history that we will examine, from ancient through the renaissance.  Next, skim a little through the week by week assignments.  Finally,  come back each week and check out what is due.  Assignments are always due in the week assigned.  So, for example, if the assignment is listed in Week 3, then those assignments are actually due by Thursday of Week 3.  Just click on the week number of subject for the week to go quickly down the page to that week's assignments.  

Checking Three Weeks at a Time: When you check this page each week, it is helpful to look at 3 weeks: the previous week, to see if you forgot anything; the next week, to see what you need to turn in next; and the week after that, so you know what will be happening.

Dealing with All the Assignments: In the first week or two, all the information in this web site can seem rather overwhelming.  However, most people figure it out by the third or fourth week and then are able to take advantage of it. 

The key to it is that this web site actually does not require more than other teachers do, but rather it offers a lot more about how to do it than you usually get.  Much of the guesswork is gone because you can find answers to your questions in so many ways.

So, use this web site as a many-faceted information source.  It can be a great help to you.  And in the end, if neither these web pages nor the FAQs page help you, you definitely should email or call me.

   :-)           

--Richard
  

Updated Nov. 24, 2017

  

   

Contents and page design: Copyright (©) 2005-2017 by Richard Jewell

Images courtesy of IHCC, Barry's Clip Art, Clip Art Warehouse, Clip Art Universe, Clipart Collection, MS Clip Art Gallery and Design Gallery Live, School Discovery, and Web Clip Art

First date of publication: January 1, 2005.  Graphics redesigned Aug. 1, 2013
Home-page server's URL: www.richard.jewell.net
CONTACT RICHARD: See www.Richard.Jewell.net/contact.htm.  Office: Business 136, Inver Hills CC

   

  

  

  

  

  

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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(Please ignore the following notes. They are from past classes:)

 

From fall '15, originally all in 10-pt. Ariel:

THIS & NEXT WEEK'S FIELD TRIP:
        EVENT D-E: Wks. 11-12 (confirmed):
Two live plays at two college theaters. Both of these are required, one at Macalester College and one at Inver Hills College. Both of them are on both weekends of the first and second weeks of Nov. (Wks. 11 & 12 in our schedule). Descriptions of both are below. I will be going to the Macalester play on Thurs., Nov. 5, when it is free (otherwise, it will cost $2). Plays typically run 2 to 2 & 1/2  hrs. with a 15-min. intermission (plan on not leaving at the intermission!). For more details, see "EVENTS D & E" in "EVENTS" at the top of this page.

        To get credit, send 400+ words about each play--and please include something about the actors' real names and how they did, so that I know you attended the IHCC play rather than watched the movie. (This event may be replaced by any live play at a college or professional theater elsewhere this semester, or by doing an equivalent amount of extra credit.)

 

NEXT WEEK'S FIELD TRIP #1: IN-PERSON MEETING
Minneapolis Institute of Arts (MIA),
1st of Two Trips: Next week we will meet at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts for the first time this semester on Thursday, Sept. 10 from about 6:30-9:00 pm for two tours. (Arrive at about 6:30; first tour starts at 6:45 pm.) Please take both official tours without going off on your own--you will have a chance to spend some time on your own later this term when we take our second trip to this museum.  Bring paper and pencil (no pens allowed) for taking notes.  These tours will be worth 3-4 X's of attendance.  Meet in the lobby of the MIA by the information desk. Entrance is free. Parking, the lobby, and the regular entrance are on the 3rd St. side.  Please do bring a few guests, if you'd like: relatives, friends, etc. (However, the time will be too long for young children; if you plan to bring more than three guests, let me know a few weeks ahead of time.)  The way to MIA can be difficult because of a nearby freeway and one-way streets, so by all means, if you want, use directions and a map such as at www.mapquest.com, but PLEASE BE SURE TO USE MY DIRECTIONS, TOO!: click on Directions. (If you absolutely must be late, let me know ahead of time what time you will show up. Then I can come and find you in the lobby at that time, and guide you to our tour. Caught in traffic? My cell # is 612-991-5853.)

THIS WEEK'S FIELD TRIP #1: IN-PERSON MEETING.
Minneapolis Institute of Arts (MIA),
1st of Two Trips: This week we will meet at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts for the first time this semester on Thursday, Sept. 10 from about 6:30-9:00 pm for two tours. (Arrive at about 6:30; first tour starts at 6:45 pm.) Please take both official tours without going off on your own--you will have a chance to spend some time on your own later this term when we take our second trip to this museum.  Bring paper and pencil (no pens allowed) for taking notes.  These tours will be worth 3-4 X's of attendance.  Meet in the lobby of the MIA by the information desk. Entrance is free. Parking, the lobby, and the regular entrance are on the 3rd St. side.  Please do bring a few guests, if you'd like: relatives, friends, etc. (However, the time will be too long for young children; if you plan to bring more than three guests, let me know a few weeks ahead of time.)  The way to MIA can be difficult because of a nearby freeway and one-way streets, so by all means, if you want, use directions and a map such as at www.mapquest.com, but PLEASE BE SURE TO USE MY DIRECTIONS, TOO!: click on Directions. (If you absolutely must be late, let me know ahead of time what time you will show up. Then I can come and find you in the lobby at that time, and guide you to our tour. Caught in traffic? My cell # is 612-991-5853.)

NEXT WEEK'S FIELD TRIP #2: IN-PERSON MEETING.
Minneapolis Institute of Arts (MIA),
2nd of Two Trips: Next week we will meet at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts for the second time this semester on Thursday, Oct. 1 from about 6:30-9:00 pm for two tours. (Arrive at about 6:30; first tour starts at 6:45 pm.) Please take both the official tour (6:45-7:45) and your own self-tour (8-9), after getting directions from me for both tours.  These tours, together, will be worth 3-4 X's of attendance.  Meet in the lobby of the MIA by the information desk. Entrance is free. Parking, the lobby, and the regular entrance are on the 3rd St. side.  Please do bring a few guests, if you'd like: relatives, friends, etc. (However, the time will be too long for young children; if you plan to bring more than three guests, let me know a few weeks ahead of time.)  The way to MIA can be difficult because of a nearby freeway and one-way streets, so by all means, if you want, use directions and a map such as at www.mapquest.com, but PLEASE BE SURE TO USE MY DIRECTIONS, TOO!: click on Directions. (If you absolutely must be late, let me know ahead of time what time you will show up. Then I can come and find you in the lobby at that time, and guide you to our tour. Caught in traffic? My cell # is 612-991-5853.)

THIS WEEK'S FIELD TRIP #2: IN-PERSON MEETING.
Minneapolis Institute of Arts (MIA),
2nd of Two Trips: This week we will meet at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts for the second time this semester on Thursday, Oct. 1 from about 6:30-9:00 pm for two tours. (Arrive at about 6:30; first tour starts at 6:45 pm.) Please take both the official tour (6:45-7:45) and your own self-tour (8-9), after getting directions from me for both tours.  These tours, together, will be worth 3-4 X's of attendance.  Meet in the lobby of the MIA by the information desk. Entrance is free. Parking, the lobby, and the regular entrance are on the 3rd St. side.  Please do bring a few guests, if you'd like: relatives, friends, etc. (However, the time will be too long for young children; if you plan to bring more than three guests, let me know a few weeks ahead of time.)  The way to MIA can be difficult because of a nearby freeway and one-way streets, so by all means, if you want, use directions and a map such as at www.mapquest.com, but PLEASE BE SURE TO USE MY DIRECTIONS, TOO!: click on Directions. (If you absolutely must be late, let me know ahead of time what time you will show up. Then I can come and find you in the lobby at that time, and guide you to our tour. Caught in traffic? My cell # is 612-991-5853.)

 

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Field Trip--Live Play #1:  Pay by Tues., Oct. 21 for your choice of the Oct. 31 or Nov. 1, 6, 7, or 8 live play at Hamline University (straight north on Snelling Ave. from I-94), one of Shakespeare's most famous tragedies, Macbeth.

Please pay Richard the ticket price for each ticket you want: place the money under his B-136 office door by Tues. 2 pm, Oct. 21, or mail it postmarked by Fri., Oct. 17. When you deliver payment, be sure to include your name somewhere, and how many tickets you are requesting. Please pay by cash or check. Checks should be made out to "Richard Jewell" with a note on them stating your name and the number of tickets.

Cost: $5 students & seniors, $8 anyone else. Family and friends are very welcome--as many as you want. Plays typically run 2 hrs. with a 15-min. intermission (don't leave at the intermission!). Show times: 7:30 pm.

Directions to and parking info about the theater: To Hamline Univ. Theater

Please arrive 1/2 hr. early. Allow time beforehand for parking and walking to the theater. Pick up your tickets at the box office. And then find your seat before the show starts.

Macbeth is a popular but heavy tragedy about a king and his wicked wife who "kill" their way up the ladder to the throne and get their just desserts in the end.

Field Trip--Live Play #2: Pay by Tues., Oct. 28 for your choice of the Nov. 14, 15, or 16 live play at Park Square Theatre (downtown St. Paul), one of Shakespeare's most famous comedies, Midsummer Night's Dream.

Please pay Richard the ticket price for each ticket you want: place the money under his B-136 office door by Tues. 2 pm, Oct. 28, or mail it postmarked by Fri., Oct. 24. When you deliver payment, be sure to include your name somewhere, and how many tickets you are requesting. Please pay by cash or check. Checks should be made out to "Richard Jewell" with a note on them stating your name and the number of tickets.

Cost: $21 for you, friends, and family (they do not have to be connected to IHCC--anyone, and as many as you want, is welcome). Plays typically run 2 to 2 & 1/2 hrs. with a 15-min. intermission (don't leave at the intermissions!). Show times: Fri. and Sat., 8 pm; Sun. 3:30 pm.

Directions to--and parking info for--the theater: To Park Square Theater. Please arrive 1/2 hr. early. Allow time beforehand for parking and walking to the theater. Pick up your tickets at the box office. And then find your seat before the show starts.

Midsummer Night's Dream is one of Shakespeare's most delightful and most enjoyed comedies; it is about a dream world of mythical creatures and humans, and what happens one night in the woods.

 

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2013:

Field Trip Payment To Reserve Your Seats for Theater Trip Wk. !2: Please pay Richard the ticket price for each ticket you want: place the money under his B-136 office door by Thurs. 2 pm, or mail it postmarked by the end of Week 9. When you deliver it, be sure to include your name somewhere, and how many tickets you are requesting. Please pay in cash or checks. Checks should be made out to "Richard Jewell" with a note on them stating your name and the number of tickets.

 

THIS WEEK'S FIELD TRIP: IN-PERSON MEETING.

Park Square Theatre in Downtown St. Paul: This week we will meet at the Park Square Theater on Fri. or Sat., Nov. 14 or 15 from about 7 or 7:15 for Shakespeare's perhaps most popular comedy, Midsummer Night's Eve. The play will last about 3 to 3&1/2 hrs. The group price will probably be around $15-20 per person, payable in advance to me no later than Week 9. It must be postmarked by mail in Week 9 (sent to 410 Groveland Av., #401, Mpls. MN 55403); or delivered directly to my B-136 office on campus, under my door, by 2 pm Thursday of Week 9.  (Note: This fee is not payable by the school for PSEOs.  PSEOs--or anyone else in the class--may replace this event by using extra credit as listed in the "Attendance" page of the course website.) 

I will accept checks and cash.  Be sure when you send/give me your money that you write (a) your own name on the check or a piece of paper, and (b) the number of tickets you want.  These group student tickets are probably about half the normal price; however, you may invite any family and friends to go with you, even if they are not students—as many as you want.  The tickets are nonrefundable. 

Please arrive by the proper time in order to pick up your tickets from me. I'll find out the time when I arrange for tickets. (Directions are at Park Square Theater.) You may also have to pay for parking in a nearby parking garage. Seating may be “general seating,” which means that you should line up at the door about 1/2 hr. before the show begins to get the seat you want. Park Square Theatre is an excellent regional theater with strong, solid shows by paid actors and actresses.  There are restaurants nearby if you want to come early for dinner. 

 

THIS WEEK'S FIELD TRIP: IN-PERSON MEETING.
The Guthrie Theater in Downtown Minneapolis: This week we will meet at the Guthrie Theater on ___, Month date from about 7 or 7:15 for the play _____. The play will last about ___ hrs. The group price will probably be arund $20-25 per person, payable in advance to me no later than Week 9. It must be postmarked by mail in Week 9 (sent to 410 Groveland Av., #401, Mpls. MN 55403); or delivered directly to my B-136 office on campus, under my door, by 2 pm Thursday of Week 9.  (Note: This fee is not payable by the school for PSEOs.  PSEOs--or anyone else in the class--may replace this event by using extra credit as listed in the "Attendance" page of the course website.) 

I will accept checks and cash.  Be sure when you send/give me your money that you write (a) your own name on the check or a piece of paper, and (b) the number of tickets you want.  These group student tickets are probably about half the normal price; however, you may invite any family and friends to go with you, even if they are not students—as many as you want.  The tickets are nonrefundable. 

Please arrive by the proper time in order to pick up your tickets from me. I'll find out the time when I arrange for tickets. (Directions are at Guthrie Theater.) You also have to pay $5-7 for parking, depending on which lot or garage you choose. The open lot 1.5 blocks west of the Guthrie is the cheapest but fills up quickly; the Guthrie garage across from the Guthrie is the most expensive; and the city garage between the other two is medium-priced.  Do NOT park on the street, or you may be towed after two hours. Seating may be “general seating,” which means that you should line up at the door about 1/2 hr. before the show begins to get the seat you want. 

The Guthrie is the best theater in Minnesota and is, in fact, considered one of the top two or three medium-size theaters in the entire nation.